MENU

Stories

Three USC researchers win $4.3 million in awards from California’s stem cell agency

Three scientists from Keck Medicine of USC have won grants exceeding $4.3 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) for research that includes creating a temporary liver for patients, finding novel ways to treat immune disorders and blood diseases, and developing new animal models for heart failure, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. The grants, …

Stem cells offer hope for children with Hurler syndrome

Without enzyme replacement therapy or a blood or marrow transplant, children born with Hurler Syndrome usually die before they reach 10 years old. Hurler Syndrome is a rare genetic disease that leaves the body without an enzyme that breaks down large molecular building blocks of bones and tissue. When these large molecules build up, they …

“Million-dollar ideas” seminar

At a special seminar on February 24, USC Stem Cell Principal Investigators discussed their “million-dollar ideas” for creating new tools and technologies to usher in the era of regenerative medicine. They shared research plans for their new, three-year Tools and Technologies grants from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM).

A Retreat from everything but stem cells

It wasn’t the pristine 27-hole course that drew more than 120 stem cell researchers from USC and beyond to the Desert Princess Golf Resort near Palm Springs. It was the sixth annual retreat for the Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at USC, which took place on October 20­ …

CIRM STAR students won first and third place at high school science fair

Every year, the Eli and Edythe Broad CIRM Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research hosts about 20 high school students in a summer program partially funded by the CIRM STAR program.

$1.75 million grant to engineer transplantable liver cells from discarded human placenta

Stem cell researchers at USC have received a $1.75 million grant to engineer transplantable liver cells from discarded human placenta, a potential cure for certain congenital metabolic disorders. If successful, the proposed cell therapy could benefit thousands of patients in California and beyond who suffer from various liver diseases. Toshio Miki, an assistant professor of …

Toshio Miki, PhD

Stay connected.