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Three USC researchers win $4.3 million in awards from California’s stem cell agency

Three scientists from Keck Medicine of USC have won grants exceeding $4.3 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) for research that includes creating a temporary liver for patients, finding novel ways to treat immune disorders and blood diseases, and developing new animal models for heart failure, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. The grants, …

Out of the woods: USC alumna and nature lover Anna Kuehl finds hope to restore her vision

Once upon a time, there was a little girl named Anna Kuehl who loved exploring the nature surrounding her home in the Bavarian Forest. Located northeast of Munich not far from the German-Czech border, this verdant landscape, called Bayerischer Wald, is a wooded, low-mountain region. Kuehl’s childhood took place in this idyllic setting, a beautiful …

Can stem cells be tricked?

Riddle me this: how do you get stem cells to thrive outside of their natural environment? According to Keyue Shen, if all else fails, you can always trick them—with artificially engineered neighbor cells. Shen, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering, and Rong Lu, an assistant professor of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine, recently won …

Eun Ji Chung receives 2017 AIChE 35 Under 35 Award

To describe Eun Ji Chung as “goal-oriented” might be the understatement of the year. Chung, a Gabilan Assistant Professor in the USC Viterbi Department of Biomedical Engineering and USC Stem Cell principal investigator, has racked up an impressive number of achievements in 2017 alone. In addition to receiving a 2017 USC Stem Cell Eli and Edythe …

Beating the spread

Cancer cells are like normal cells, only trickier. They carry genetic mutations that can hoodwink their surroundings to favor their growth. Using biologically inspired in vitro models, Keyue Shen, an assistant professor at USC Viterbi and principal investigator with USC Stem Cell, researches how cancer cells interact with nearby cells in order to metastasize, or …

Megan McCain receives American Heart Association Faculty Award

Megan McCain has received a 2016 Scientist Development Grant from the American Heart Association. The three-year, $231,000 grant supports highly promising early career scientists in cardiovascular and stroke research. McCain—Gabilan Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, and Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine—and her research team will focus specifically on developing human-based platforms to test drugs …

Breanne Grady

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