MENU

News

News

USC Stem Cell junior faculty balance babies with biomedical research

Growing stem cells isn’t just something junior faculty do in the lab. Eight of the junior faculty in the Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine recently welcomed new babies into their families—more than half of them within the past year. Here, our junior faculty parents share their joy and wisdom about balancing career …

From restoring sight to reversing brain damage, USC stem cell researchers are making life-changing discoveries

If anyone has a clear vision of the power of stem cell cures, it’s Anna Kuehl. She suffered a retina-wrecking disease that cost her much of her sight before USC physicians surgically implanted stem cells to restore her ability to see. Today, she can see the letters on computer keys, use her iPhone and read …

Yang Chai bridges the gap from the lab bench to the dental chair

As a young oral surgeon in China, Yang Chai often operated on babies born with cleft lips or palates. “You talk to the parents, and they were very emotional and trying find out why their kid got this cleft palate or other malformation in the face,” he said. “You can tell them all the statistics—one …

From left, Muniza Junaid and Anson Tam (Photo by Cristy Lytal)

Countdown to Commencement: Anson Tam brings the Hawaii perspective to surgery, research and swimming

Anson Tam is an aspiring doctor from Honolulu, who brings a hardworking, sun loving, laid back Hawaiian attitude to swimming, research and surgery. Tam was initially inspired to become a doctor by the primary care physicians in his hometown. Through the years, he saw many of them working hard to care for their patients, despite …

How the roots of teeth develop has long been a mystery. Professor Yang Chai aims to change that — and eventually regrow the roots of teeth.

Researchers seek the root of tooth development

The lower two-thirds of a tooth are known as the root. Normally covered in bone, they anchor the tooth into the jaw. But the exact mechanisms and pathways that create the root — and its delicate interactions with the rest of the tooth — have not been well-studied. Associate Dean of Research Yang Chai PhD …

From right, USC Stem Cell scientists Francesca Mariani and Stephanie T. Kuwahara (Photo by Sergio Bianco)

Messenger cells bring good news for bone healing

How do bones heal, and how could they heal better? The answer to these questions may lie in a newly discovered population of “messenger” cells, according to a recent USC Stem Cell study published in the journal eLife. “With nearly half a million patients in the U.S experiencing failed bone repair every year, stimulating these …

Regrowing enamel? USC Dental Professor Janet Moradian-Oldak is on the case

Dental enamel is tricky stuff. Even though it’s the body’s hardest material, if it wears away from cavities, acidic food or drinks or overbrushing, it doesn’t regenerate.  All that could change in the future, though. Ostrow Professor Janet Moradian-Oldak has been developing a special hydrogel that can promote the growth of an enamel-like surface on …

This tiny fish could unlock mysteries about growing old

Back in its native habitat, the African turquoise killifish wiggles from its egg, eats, spawns and dies — all within a few months. Life goes by fast when your home is a quickly evaporating pond of rainwater. But even when raised as pets in a home aquarium, these killifish still live for less than a …

(Illustration by Chris Gash)

Eat less, live longer? The science of fasting and longevity

When it comes to what, when and how we eat, fasting — voluntarily abstaining from food for varying periods of time — is having a moment. It was the most popular diet of 2018, according to a survey from the International Food Information Council Foundation (IFICF), and forms of fasting rank among Google’s top-trending diet …

Bérénice Benayoun honored for genetics research

The Genetics Society of America (GSA) and the Gruber Foundation have awarded Assistant Professor Bérénice Benayoun the 2019 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award for her research in genetics. The award, intended to showcase talented female scientists with a focus on genetics, allocates a total of $75,000 that is then distributed evenly across 3 years. GSA …

USC Stem Cell scientist Gage Crump gives a bare bones explanation of eLife skeletal development study

How do our skeletons form during embryonic development? To approach this question, PhD student Dion Giovannone, research scientist Sandeep Paul and the USC Stem Cell laboratory of Gage Crump looked to our not-so-distant relative: the tiny, transparent zebrafish. Crump explains their latest findings, published in eLife, about how embryonic cartilage transforms into adult bone. How …

Eli and Edythe Broad to receive honorary degrees at USC commencement ceremony

USC will recognize philanthropists Edythe and Eli Broad and five other honorary degree candidates for their leadership in government, science, philanthropy, humanitarianism and the arts at the university’s 136th commencement ceremony on the University Park Campus on May 10.

Findings published in Biomaterials Special Issue of the Journal of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society

USC dental researchers developing special film that could revolutionize the way peri-implantitis treated

Three million people in the United States currently have dental implants, and every year that number increases by about 500,000. But, for some, getting a dental implant is not the end of the story. Similar to what occurs with a natural tooth, bacteria can build up on the implant’s base and below the gum line. …

Stem cell scientists take it one cell at a time at the Junior Faculty Candidate Mini-symposium

Cells should be treated as individuals, according to the scientists who presented research at the Junior Faculty Candidate Mini-symposium, hosted by USC’s Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine on February 5. While cells have traditionally been evaluated as populations, these up-and-coming scientists shared their frontier approaches for studying the specific features and activities …

NIH awards USC Stem Cell scientist Denis Evseenko $1.69 million to study arthritis and aging

What causes joints to age, lose their regenerative capacity and succumb to arthritis, and how can we slow this process? To address these questions, the National Institutes of Health have awarded a $1.69 million research project grant to investigator Denis Evseenko, associate professor of orthopaedic surgery and stem cell biology and regenerative medicine at the …

USC Stem Cell acquires two instruments to advance state-of-the-art cell sorting

When it comes to sorting cells or other small particles, there’s no better place to do so than USC. The university’s Flow Cytometry Facility recently acquired two top-of-the-line cell sorters, the BD FACSymphony and the BioRad S3e, thanks to generous support from several USC sources.

Innovators of USC: Justin Ichida stays at the forefront of ALS research

Justin Ichida keeps his research patient-based. That’s why Ichida, an assistant professor of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, and his startup company AcuraStem participated in the ALS Association Golden West Chapter Walk to Defeat ALS at Exposition Park in Los Angeles.

Innovators of USC: University-affiliated entrepreneurs focus on autoimmune disease

Approximately 50 million Americans suffer from autoimmune disease, according to the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association. This includes the millions suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. Researchers at USC have developed novel small molecule drugs in regenerative and anti-inflammatory medicine that aim to provide relief and healing for patients with these diseases.

USC researchers draw closer to biological treatment for birth defect

Could we be one step closer to developing a biological treatment for craniosynostosis? Building upon a body of research that demonstrated that the premature fusion of skull bones — which can cause a host of problems as an infant’s brain continues to grow — is caused by a lack of stem cells, Associate Dean of …

Disease risk seen in disrupted biological clock

USC scientists report that a novel time-keeping mechanism within liver cells that helps sustain key organ tasks can contribute to diseases when its natural rhythm is disrupted.

Stay connected.